A well-defined low-pressure system in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico has become Tropical Depression 22, according to the National Hurricane Center.

The tropical depression is forecast to become Tropical Storm Wilfred by Friday afternoon, forecasters said. This would be the 21st named storm — and the last name on the list for the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season. Any other storms that form would then be named after the Greek alphabet, beginning with Alpha, Beta, Gamma and Delta.

Elsewhere in the Atlantic, Hurricane Teddy is a powerful Category 4 storm as of the 11 p.m. update, as Vicky and Sally were fading away.

As of 11 p.m. Thursday, the Gulf of Mexico tropical depression is moving toward the northeast near 3 mph and is forecast to meander over the western Gulf of Mexico into the weekend, according to the hurricane center.

“Strengthening is forecast during the next few days, and the depression is expected to become a tropical storm on Friday,” forecasters said. “The system could be near or at hurricane strength by Sunday.”

The National Hurricane Center says, “Strengthening is forecast during the next few days, and the depression is expected to become a tropical storm on Friday. The system could be near or at hurricane strength by Sunday.”
The National Hurricane Center says, “Strengthening is forecast during the next few days, and the depression is expected to become a tropical storm on Friday. The system could be near or at hurricane strength by Sunday.”

Another disturbance in the far eastern Atlantic with a chance of forming into a tropical depression is also on the National Hurricane Center’s radar. It had a 40% chance of forming into a tropical cyclone in the next 48 hours and 50% in the next five days.

The system, described as an elongated area of low pressure, was producing showers and thunderstorms a few hundred miles south-southwest of the Cabo Verde Islands on Thursday, according to the hurricane center’s 8 p.m. advisory.

“Environmental conditions are expected to be conducive for development during the next few days, and a tropical depression could form before upper-level winds become less favorable by late this weekend. The system is forecast to move west-northwestward at 10 to 15 mph during the next several days,” forecasters wrote.

There is also a non-tropical area of low pressure over the far northeastern Atlantic Ocean several hundred miles east of the Azores. It is forecast to move eastward then northeastward at about 10 mph where its chances of subtropical development will decrease as it reaches the coast of Portugal on Friday.

It has a 30% chance of forming into a cyclone in the next five days.

Hurricane Teddy is now a powerful Category 4 storm.
Hurricane Teddy is now a powerful Category 4 storm.

Forecasters are also tracking Hurricane Teddy, which strengthened into a Category 4 storm with 140 mph winds Thursday evening, as it continues to move toward Bermuda.

As of the 11 p.m. update, forecasters said that Teddy could edge closer to Category 5 on Friday, but it was expected to weaken back to a Category 2 or 3 before it approaches Bermuda on Sunday.

“Teddy is expected to approach Bermuda as a hurricane this weekend and make its closest approach to the island late Sunday or Monday,” forecasters said. “While the exact details of Teddy’s track and intensity near the island are not yet known, the risk of strong winds, storm surge, and heavy rainfall on Bermuda is increasing.”

Tropical Storm Vicky is expected to weaken back into a tropical depression soon and Tropical Depression Sally is forecast to move through Alabama and Georgia and into South Carolina late Thursday or early Friday. Sally is expected to become a remnant low either Thursday night or Friday morning, according to the hurricane center’s final advisory on the system at 5 a.m.

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